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Sufism the Mystical path to God

Discussion in 'Sufism' started by healing_angel, Dec 13, 2006.

  1. healing_angel

    healing_angel Banned

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    From my awareness Sufism is the Islamic Mystical way of life just like in Christianity=Paganaism, Judaism=Kabala wayetc so it seems all religions have their mystical side like Hinduism & Buddhism sorry for my spelling mistakes.

    sodoes anyone know a Sufi? or is practicing the Sufi way of life Muslims I believe?

    I believe the poet, Self realized Soul behind this movement is RUMI

    he has some amazing inspiringtexts

    check out the links= [link=http://www.khamush.com/poems.html]http://www.khamush.com/poems.html[/link]

    [link=http://www.khamush.com/]http://www.khamush.com/[/link]

    [link=http://www.rumi.net/]http://www.rumi.net/[/link]
     
  2. tigress

    tigress New Member

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    RE: Sufism the Mystical path to God

    Yes, I have met many who practice sufism when i go to dances of universal peace

    tigress
     
  3. Joanna

    Joanna New Member

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    RE: Sufism the Mystical path to God

    can anybody answer a question i've been wondering about? Is Sufism the spiritual side and the sunni's and shiite's political?
     
  4. oakapple

    oakapple New Member

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    RE: Sufism the Mystical path to God

    Thanks for the links.........they look great........

    Blessings

    Oakapple
     
  5. sunanda

    sunanda New Member

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    RE: Sufism the Mystical path to God

    Hi all

    I went to my first Sufi gathering last night in London. It was under the auspices of the Sufi Order (UK) http://www.sufiorder.co.uk/index.php

    Much of the teaching resonated perfectly with what I already believe and the prayers and chanting were beautiful. (But I have a terrible dilemma - I am totally totally tone deaf so I am embarassed to join in the chanting as I will spoil it for the others![&o])

    The class - and I don't usually enjoy classes - was wonderful. One of the teachings was: 'I glorify God in order to create God in me'. Now that chimes with my leaning towards devotion (bhakti in Hinduism). Also that we should not try to awaken anyone who is not ready.

    Sufism, as I now understand it, tells us to aim for self realisation/enlightenment/union with the One but then we are to 'come back' again in order to help others. Love, harmony and service.

    It was all quite beautiful, including the opening guided meditation on the four elements.

    I shall go again.

    Maybe - Mods - we could have a Sufism thread because it really is very different from Islam. And Sufis have been persecuted by mainstream Muslims throughout the ages.

    With love
    Sunanda xxx
     
  6. Amelia Jane

    Amelia Jane New Member

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    RE: Sufism the Mystical path to God

    Thanks for sharing sunanda, it sounds fasinating, I hope you continue to enjoy the classes/meetings

    Did you mean thread? Or did you mean forum?

    Love
    Amy
    xxxx
     
  7. sunanda

    sunanda New Member

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    RE: Sufism the Mystical path to God

    Hi Amy
    DOH!!! Silly me. I meant forum!

    Love
    Sunanda x
     
  8. Amelia Jane

    Amelia Jane New Member

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    RE: Sufism the Mystical path to God

    LOL...I'll raise the question for you;)

    Love
    Amy
    xxx
     
  9. Venetian

    Venetian Active Member

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    RE: Sufism the Mystical path to God

    I'm no expert - and there was a thread before on this - but in some ways Sufis can be seen as the mystical side of Islam, but it's not really so simple.

    I've met Muslims who were very mystical indeed, but could tell me nothing of Sufism as they weren't one. Alas ..... there are various schools of thought even within Sufism. Even here on HP some time back we had someone ironically mocking (as I recall) who the best or "real" Sufi leaders and movements were.

    Some view Sufism as so liberal and so all-embracing that it could be questioned whether it actually is as simple as just being "the mystical side of Islam", or whether it is something broader.

    A TV documentary also discussed once on HP suggested that Sufism could be the answer to global Islamic troubles - since they are not really political and are in no way fundamentalist. (Example: Sufis use music and dance a lot; many fundamentalist Muslims are actually against music and dance.)

    V
     
  10. trin

    trin New Member

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    RE: Sufism the Mystical path to God

    Oh yes please!!! Wouldn't it be awesome to have a Sufi thread!

    We could devote a thread to some of the most inspiring poetry from Sufi poets such as Rumi, Kabir and Hafiz!!!

    Trin
    x
     
  11. Amelia Jane

    Amelia Jane New Member

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    RE: Sufism the Mystical path to God

    Hi Sunanda & all, please see that this thread has now been moved into the Sufism forum (well sub forum);)

    Love
    Amy
    xxx
     
  12. Startingtoheal

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    I integrate Sufism with my present religious beliefs and have a nice little collection of books in translation by Sufi poets (Hafiz, Rumi, Attar, et al). The only famous Sufi practitioner I know of here in the states is now-retired fashion designer Mary McFadden.
     
  13. Startingtoheal

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    That is one of the biggest appeals of Sufism - one does not need to be a Muslim in order to follow the path. Plus being able to choose to become one, being able to practice it on one's own if not deciding to join a local organized Sufi group - that's real freedom in religious belief/practice!
     
  14. spiritual nut

    spiritual nut New Member

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    Shams was like a tramp,

    One of my favourite Sufi tales relates to the meeting of Shams and Rumi;

    Shams was like a tramp, or mendicant, rolling around the lanes of Konya, today located in central Turkey.

    This mad dervish, clothed in rags, with knotted hair and beard, was one of the five Perfect Masters of the time.

    Rumi, by contrast, was a man of great intellectual learning and ran a madrasa of repute. He was held in high regard by the local community, with his sermons in the mosque transcribed and distributed for general consumption.

    However he started to become dissatisfied with the intellectual, and drift towards a more mystical approach.

    One winter’s evening in 1244 his world became a little more unhinged. Shams grabbed the reins to Rumi’s horse, and then set about roasting his intellectual understanding.

    Rumi’s heart knew what was truly being offered and he embraced the opportunity. He spent more and more time in the PM’s presence, imbibing his spiritual fire.

    Rumi’s students and friends became worried and jealous of this new development, felt threatened, and tried to have Shams bumped off on several occasions.

    Rumi even turned his back on Shams at one time, leading to Shams leaving.

    All of this unwittingly led to the creation of the whirling dervishes, without which any modern day spiritual fair would be lacking.

    Shams came back to Konya a year later, only to be disposed of by Rumi’s students and family once again.

    Shams-e-Tabriz (1185-1248)
    Mevlana Djalal ad-Din Rumi (1207-1273)
     

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