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Short luteal phase?

Discussion in 'Fertility' started by zitroney, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. zitroney

    zitroney New Member

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    Hello,

    I'm new to this site and the forum but I'm in the process of trying to figure out some tricky things and I wondered if anyone had experienced anything similar?

    I was on the pill for a year and came off due to horrible side effects. I decided to try NFP as I wanted something totally natural, my husband was up for it and we've been doing it successfully now for 13 months. We're not currently TTC but we're really really keen to start a family in about a year's time (when I finally qualify for maternity pay!) so in truth my query about the short luteal phase is all a bit academic really...but...

    I've noticed from my charts that I tend to ovulate on day 20 (of a 27-8 day cycle). The last four days (24-8 ish) I also get dark spotting (which I NEVER had before I went on the pill). This suggests to me I've been bleeding for a couple of days maybe (dark old blood) which begs the question if an egg was fertilised what would happen to it? Obviously if the lining of the uterus is breaking down as early as day 24 (or before really) then it won't have anywhere to implant. :eek:

    I've spoken to my GP (female) who has been quite supportive and has arranged two blood tests to see if I'm ovulating - which isn't really the issue but at least she's taking notice of me! I also went out today and bought some B6 and Agnus Castus from Holland and Barratt - they said it's fine to take these two together but I'm not sure and I wondered if anyone here could advise? (My GP said she couldn't advise on AC at all and hadn't heard of it, but said B6 was fine).

    I'm hoping that the B6 and AC will help to lengthen my luteal phase. I've read on other sites/forums that anything shorter than 10-12 days is considered a problem by the NHS, but as we're not actively TTC and failing I don't really have a leg to stand on from the GP's point of view.

    I'm slightly panicking and wondering whether we should just start trying now so that we don't run the risk of wasting a year...errr....really not sure what to do. Please help. :confused:
     
  2. CarolineN

    CarolineN New Member

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    Hi zitroney

    Welcome to Healthy Pages :wave:

    Endocrinology is a complex subject and if you are looking at a complementary therapist to help sort out your problem you really you need someone who specialises in this - like here. Artificial hormones amongst other things, including stress, can really upset some peoples' systems and it might take a while to normalise - there is some helpful information here.

    I would also suggest you take the right prepregnancy supplements and a good wholefood diet - again more information about that here. Your body will then be in a much better position to receive the fertilised egg and nurture it to full term.

    Wishing you the best of health.
     
  3. Footsie01

    Footsie01 New Member

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  4. SarahReflex

    SarahReflex New Member

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    I realise this is an old-ish post, but perhaps you are still at the pre-trying phase so wanted to offer my advice. You've been given some great websites there and ones I recommend. What I would say about short luteal phase is that is does need to be taken seriously, before you try to conceive. Supplements such as AC and B6 do seem to work for some, and other need progesterone supplements to correct the luteal phase.

    When I was trying to conceive I had a short luteal phase (8-11 days) which meant that on the months I did get pregnant, the pregnancy would not last beyond when my period was due. This is known as a chemical pregnancy (ie very early miscarriage). This is a common issue with short luteal phase.

    So my advice would be to have blood tests at 7 days post ovulation to check your progesterone levels and if they are low (below 30 nmol/l) seek progesterone support before you start trying for a baby).

    Clinical Diagnostic Services at Viveka, London are fantastic in this area and are the reason I am a mummy today!

    Best of luck,

    Sarah
     

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