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Osteoarthritis of the spine

Discussion in 'Arthritis' started by Brandswife, Jan 6, 2016.

  1. Brandswife

    Brandswife New Member

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    Hello I am a newbie to this site and I hoping somebody here can help me.
    I have been suffering lower back pain for about 8 years.
    At first it was diagnosed as Sciatica.
    I was given Cocodamol and Naproxen and a course of Physio.

    But it never really got any better and after a very sever episode this summer (3 months off work) I went back to my GP and begged for further investigation.
    This was done and now I have been diagnosed with Osteoarthritis of my spine.

    I asked for a referral to a local spinal unit but have been told there is no point as nothing can be done!
    They have now given me Gabapentin which has helped, but I am only 48 and in so much pain I am scared about how this will progress and what the future holds for me.

    I already have to be careful how I interact with my grandchildren (both less than 2yrs old) I can't play with them as I would like or pick them up a lot of the time.
    I have had to reduce my working hours as I am desk bound and can't sit/stand for long periods.

    Please can anybody tell me if there is something that could be done.

    Many thanks.
     
  2. Jabba The Hut

    Jabba The Hut Well-Known Member

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    Have you considered looking at alternative or complementary therapies? Osteopathy? Massage therapy? Bowen Technique? Acupuncture? Alexander Technique? CBT for pain management?

    My GP and an orthopaedic consultant will do nothing about chronic/acute arthritis in my right knee - I'm deemed 'too young' for replacement on the NHS (a private hospital would do it next week so long as I pay!!) - so prescribed similar stuff to your meds, only I'm allergic to a couple.

    I decided the only person who could change the situation was me, so have lost weight (more to go!), go to a pool for water exercise 2 or 3 mornings a week, walk the dog for at least an hour every day - she's a rescue dog - 12 years old, arthritic like me, so moves at a gentle pace, and do Pilates (at home) as often as I can, to try and keep the joints as flexible as I can. I use capsaicin cream on my knee every other night, and take paracetamol if I feel the need.
     
  3. Cascara

    Cascara Active Member

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    Hi, welcome,

    I would ask why me, why osteoarthritis in the spine at 48?

    Which parts of the spine are affected? Do you know? That will help the treatment, and exact diagnosis, what was the dx made from? Xrays only show part of the picture and it is also essential to take weightbearing xrays ( standing and sitting and leaning) to get the full picture, then mri's will show disc and soft tissue condition.
    They have made the differential between osteo (caused by wear and tear) and rheumatoid (caused by reaction and inflamation) so presumably you have had blood tests done?

    If you are on pain in Naproxen try Diclofenac or one of the other antinflammatories. Do you notice when it is getting time to take the meds? What about pain patches?

    I would ask for a second opinion, you should not just be left like this. but easy for me to say, I suffer from a bad spine with lots of conditions now including the inevitable osteoarthritis of the spine, but I know why and where, what levels and areas (foramin/facets/vertebrae)
     
  4. Bieke Maertens

    Bieke Maertens New Member

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    Hello,

    I am a student Osteopathy in Belgium.
    It looks like your complaints are an indication for an osteopathic treatment. Osteoartritis of the spine means there is an inflammation between one or more joints of the vertebra of the spine. When there is an inflammation of a joint, it means there is a compression or a loss of mobility of the joint.
    Osteopathy tracks down why this inflammation exists and helps to improve the mobility and the complaint in several ways:
    1. Mechanical way: The osteopath searches for mobility loss in the body. There might be a loss of mobility of the pelvis which affects the mobility of the spine. The mobility of the vertebra needs to be assessed and corrected, this is often done by a manipulation. The effect of this manipulation is proven by multiple studies (1).
    2. Vascular way: when there is an inflammation it is important to provide a good blood supply to the area and drain the area in order to improve the inflammation. For example mobilization of the area improves the vascularisation.
    Improvement of vascularization means also the chest area needs to move in an optimal as well, because of the blood supply and drain of the heart in this area. An osteopath often treats this area for these reasons.
    3. Neurological way: pain is provided by the nerve system to protect body tissue, so an osteopath also works on the neurological system to improve the pain. This is also done by manipulation and mobilization of the pain area.
    4. Metabolic way: it is important that the patient eats healthy and takes enough rest. This means no sugar, no alcohol, maybe there are some intollerances or allergies for certain food that needs to be detected and a good sleep hygiene.

    kind regards,
    Bieke Maertens

    references:
    (1) Franke, H., Franke, J-D., Fryer, G., 2014. Osteopathic manipulative treatment for nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 15, p286.
     
    scommstech and Cascara like this.
  5. Evercore

    Evercore New Member

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    If you are still looking for help, the McKenzie Method is very helpful. These a highly trained physical therapists who can accurately assess you. On my website, Evercore, I also have helpful tips.
     
    #5 Evercore, Mar 5, 2018
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 5, 2018
  6. omega1

    omega1 Well-Known Member

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    Have you tried CBD oil? There are articles that show it helps arthritis sufferers manage their condition and pain. I have been using CBD oil and diet changes and Reiki to manage the chronic arthritis in my spine and it has helped me.
     
  7. omega1

    omega1 Well-Known Member

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    I have tried CBD oil for my spine and it really helps. I take 20mg in drops a day when the pain is bad until it gets better. Usually when I get a flare up I take CBD oil for 2 or 3 days and it helps.
     

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