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Onions and meditation ....

Discussion in 'Meditation' started by Anne Mary, Mar 22, 2015.

  1. DanielKotzer

    DanielKotzer Member

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    one problem I have with not eating onion and garlic for the sake of meditation is: What about the health benefits of these vegetables?

    I don't drink wine as I used to, but once in a while I take a glass of wine, because it strengthens the heart.

    Garlic I can eat once a week. But I'm used to eating a slice of bread with tomato and onion, every morning, and it is a very healthy combination.

    What would you do in my place? give away the health benefits for the sake of meditation?
     
  2. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

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    Most of the benefits of onions can be found in other vegetables, can't they? Are there other alliums that you can eat - leeks, chives, some of the perennials like Babington's leeks? I also suspect that the older, wilder forms are possibly healthier (or at least as healthy) as the hyper-cultivated onions that we generally grow/buy.
     
  3. DanielKotzer

    DanielKotzer Member

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    I guess you're right, I'll have to find substitutes.
     
  4. hambo

    hambo New Member

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    I think everything in moderation is the key. My master explained it to me that some foods are very tamasic (inertia), rajasik (excite the senses) whilst other are satvic. Hope I've got the spelling of these right. Our diets should be more Satvic but he explained that some people completely abstain from rajasik foods like onions, chilli's etc and close observation you will some of those people are quite dull like. For meditation that's going to cause problems too. That's why I think a balance is healthy.
     
  5. Anne Mary

    Anne Mary Active Member

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    If you know what you're doing, it is not strict or difficult at all.
    Roughly, it goes as follows:
    If you have any allium, even garlic, raw with breakfast, it won't affect your next morning's meditation. Chives you can even eat with your evening meal. Cooked alliums have unfortunately a longer lasting effect.
    As for meat, lamb is better than beef or pork, and chicken even better. I can eat lamb (not loads) for lunch and it does not bother my meditation the next morning.
    You can eat raw roots even with your evening meal if you want to meditate in the morning. The effect of cooked roots lasts longer: ab. 8 hours, and dried roots like ginger and curry longer still. So you have to be careful with spices, but chillis or pepper are always fine!
    If you have the details and work it out, it gets easy after a while and you don't have to abstain from anything. And of course, whenever it suits you, you can drop it altogether for a while, there is nothing wrong with that.

    See below for the exact details given to me by the Acem organisation. These are the ones I follow and they work.
    Love, Annemieke.
     

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  6. Anne Mary

    Anne Mary Active Member

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    Sorry, here is the complete file with info about drinks.
     

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  7. DanielKotzer

    DanielKotzer Member

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    Thanks, very helpful
     
  8. Tashanie

    Tashanie Well-Known Member

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    And just to add another strand to this....the effect you notice could be psychological. You are expecting your meditation to be improved because you abstain from, or consume, a certain food......so by a placebo effect it is.
     
  9. Anne Mary

    Anne Mary Active Member

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    Ha! No, sorry. My shock discovery came after I had been to many courses and always thought I was not very good at meditating.
    Then I happened to hear that dried roots, amongst other stuff, were bad. The courses, of course, served food without ginger and the like. However, I had always brought some of my favourite sugarless ginger biscuits as a sort of comfort food. When I stopped having those, the meditation improved impressively ......
    There were many more things like that, which convinced my sceptical mind. There is a point where, though sceptical, and aware of these psychological effects, you have to give in to science I'm afraid.
    Acem meditation was started about 50 years ago by university students and still an awful lot of practitioners are medical professors, doctors and the like. They are not gurus or indeed religious at all and have done their research.
     
  10. Anne Mary

    Anne Mary Active Member

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    Sorry Sally, I did not mean to be critical of your message. You are quite right about the psychological effects of such things. I was just trying to explain that I don't think this is the case here.
     

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