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Numbness around bridge of nose and cheeks

Discussion in 'Neurological Problems' started by ZenJen, Oct 3, 2010.

  1. ZenJen

    ZenJen New Member

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    Hey everyone

    I wondered if anyone had any ideas on this!

    For the past 2 - 3 months I have been experiencing which can only be described as numbness all around the bridge of my nose and extending out towards my cheeks - I dont wear glasses, but, i guess the best way to desribe it would be it feels like i have been wearing glasses which have been pinching on my nose and left it numb .

    I havent had any injuries to my face, I dont get headaches, migraine. I am not on any medication.

    Ive seen two doctors, both looked blankly and told me to "keep an eye on it" as did my osteopath.

    It doesnt cause me pain but the sensation is there, and its constant and its making me wonder if anything more "sinister" is going on because its the most bizarre feeling ever.

    To be honest i am concerned about it being MS because I had an auntie who died from MS several years ago

    earlier on in the year i suffer sciatica, numbness in my toes but that disapeared after about 2 weeks . I have no idea if this is connected at all

    I just wondered if anyone had any ideas? I cant really afford to see too many specialists as the osteo cost me 40 pounds a session, and the doctors just dont have a clue. I cant even find anything to help me on google ;)


    Also - the numbness is symmetrical, it feels even on both sides, which is why the doctor said it didnt sound like nerve damage (which affects usually one side?)


    I am confused.com ! :)
     
  2. CarolineN

    CarolineN New Member

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    Hi there Zenjen :wave:

    I can't offer you an answer for your problem, but it might be helpful to follow a wholefood diet - avoiding additives, fillers and all sorts put into processed foods that might be making the problem worse. Make sure you have a multicoloured range of fruit and vegetables to eat the widest variety of plant nutrients - a minimum of 5 a day, but preferably 8. Reduce processed meats (bacon, ham, salami, sausages etc) and red meats (these are pro-inflammatory), but eat oily fish 2-3 times a week like salmon, mackerel, herring and sardine which supply the essential omega oils necessary for every cell in the body and especially the brain and nervous system. And if it were me I'd add a supplement of both omega-3 and -6 such as EyeQ.

    I would also take a quality multivitamin/multimineral (obtainable from a wholefood store - the ones in the chemist or supermarket are mostly made of artificial vitamins and supplied at doses which aren't helpful anyway!) B vitamins are vital for nerve function but work in conjunction with other vitamins and minerals so a 'multi' is the best option. Unfortunately due to food processing and modern farming practices most foods are depleted these days.

    I would also add a good probiotic which contains preferably L. acidophilus, Bifidobacteria and possibly Saccharomyces boulardii too which help your body in so many ways (too many to mention here) and in the quantities of a minimum of 10 billion per capsule but preferably more. You'll find these in the chiller cabinet of the healthfood shop.

    If nothing else this will boost your health considerably and maybe your symptoms will subside. It won't take 5 minutes to make a difference but in about a month's time you should start to see some health improvements - so I'd look at 3 months for re-assessment.

    Wishing you the best of health.
     
  3. ava

    ava New Member

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    Hi ZenJen

    I would support Caroline's suggestion to follow a wholefoods diet to support your general health - irrespective of what the cause of the symptoms might be.

    I was doing some reading a few days ago on the neurological condition 'dropsy' - which is a weakness of the calf muscles, that you sometimes see in older folk, which leave them unable to lift their feet. Even fish get it, apparently! Dropsy responds well to thiamine (vitamin B1) supplementation because it is a symptom of thiamine *deficiency*.

    Whilst I can imagine you wondering what does that have to do with your symptoms? Well there is a huge difference between symptoms of a subclinical deficiency (i.e. levels in the blood which aren't low enough to be regarded as a 'deficiency') and a deficiency. Depending on where your weakest links are will depend on what your odd symptoms might be. You may get numbness across your nose, I may get restless eyelids, someone else might get something else. My reading of odd nerve conditions generally lead to thiamine.

    Well, whilst it would be ridiculous of me to attempt to diagnose via the internet, you do seem to have a range of mild neuropathy symptoms. Who knows what is causing it. But if the medics are unable to help then it might be worth trying other things to see if that helps. My suggestion would be to supplement with a decent dose of B complex (50mg/day) and to take two additional doses of 50mg thiamine. [You generally have to buy a 100mg thiamine tablet, and break it in half.] Making sure than one of those doses is taken last thing at night, and isn't taken with the B complex. If you don't feel comfortable with the idea of supplementing with thiamine, fair enough - then the 50mg of B complex should support your nerves adequately. I'd stay on those for at least a couple of months.

    Interestingly MS patients have demonstrated very low blood thiamine levels - and treatment (non-traditional, obviously) are injections of up to 1000mg/day of thiamine. I don't know whether that was effective, so my saying that may be a red herring. My point is that it may be that genetically your family needs more thiamine, or excretes it faster than 'normal' folk. Diabetics, for example, excrete thiamine 15 times faster than non-diabetics - hence some genotypes need more of certain nutrients.

    Otherwise follow Caroline's excellent advice and pay particular attention to avoid refined carbs (especially rice and pasta) because they leach the body of B vitamins, especially thiamine.

    Ava x
     
  4. kvdp

    kvdp New Member

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    Maybe try another osteopath - this could be related to a problem with movement of the nasal bones - two very small and delicate bones at the bridge of the nose. If you have had even a mild injury long ago, a sinus infection, or perhaps even a mild strain during birth, then the movement of these bones may be limited, thus affecting nutrition to the area.

    Of course that's one hypothesis. There are others, 'onion-skin' distribution of sensory change (you can google this) can be related to problems in the brain-stem. This fact might not be in the GPs working memory, hence might be worth asking for a referral to a neurologist to be sure. The toe symptoms you had may indeed be related if the central nervous system is involved.

    [As for MS, one sign doesn't make a disease. However, 'demyelination' is the result of the body stripping Essential Fatty Acids out of nerve sheaths. This happens when we are chronically stressed, overactive or busy. Cortisol (a stress hormone) requires EFAs, hence there is sometimes not enough to go around. Hence with MS seeking help for the underlying cause is vital.]
     
    #4 kvdp, Oct 3, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 3, 2010
  5. ZenJen

    ZenJen New Member

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    Wow thank you all for your imput, I appreciate it a lot!

    My diet is actually vegetarian, apart from fish which I eat a few times a week.. I do however eat heaps of bread, and pasta, which I have cut out about 3 days ago. So I shall keep that up.

    I do juice a few times a week, and eat a lot of spinach (I love it in the morning with scrambled egg yumm) and I do supplement with hemp and flax oil, but a bit inconsistantly.

    Ill look into the supplements you suggested and add them, too.

    Im reading up on a raw diet at the moment, it's always interested me a lot.

    With regards to MS, are there any specific tests you can have to determine whether you have it? Im in australia now for a few months and I might be able to get to see a specialist a lot easier than in the UK!


    Interesting you mention stress. This summer has been incredibly stressful (studying for ITEC!, work, money, relationships!) now im away, things might get a bit better.


    Do you think a kinesiologist would be able to help in this matter? Im interested in seeing one.

    Thanks again everyone, much appreciated. I just feel so unbalanced , its a very bizarre feeling!
     
  6. ZenJen

    ZenJen New Member

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    Very interesting, thanks so much for this. I will add more efas - and make it consistant. Im going to stick with this for three months at least.. cut out the alcohol, and refined sugar too.

    x
     
  7. ava

    ava New Member

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    Be careful. Certain raw foods contains substances that interfere with thiamine metabolism. The only one I can remember off the top of my head is blackcurrant. It's in one of my books, and I'll have a look for that info tomorrow. [I have a feeling spinach is another one... but I'll confirm or not tomorrow.]

    Ava x
     
  8. kvdp

    kvdp New Member

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    EFA stripping is not just about diet, the cortisol link is hugely important. Even when we are not stressed, our sympathetic nervous system can be chronically overactive, especially if we have suffered trauma of some kind (physical or mental), extended crisis or period of strain. This can create an imprint on the system (physical and functional) that may require help to unravel, even when the source of stress is removed.

    The other thing that increases cortisol levels is toxicity. A recent MS patient of mine had a habit of eating junk food (including margarine, HFCS, cola, etc etc), and had several metal fillings, but really the whole thing began after working on a farm and being exposed to crop chemicals. As well as this she was a 'bit of a live wire', shall we say. People use toxicty as a way of dealing with stress, and stress as a way of dealing with toxicity.
     
  9. ZenJen

    ZenJen New Member

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    Kvdp - interesting, I learnt a tiny bit about this during the a&p learning but its really interesting to hear you explain it like this.

    The thing is, my cause of stress is not likely to be resolved any time soon. Im not sure how I can deal with the mental stress in a better way, i try meditate every day but theres still a lot going on. Im not sure what to do about it really. i even have dream about it.

    Some other weird symtoms not nessecarily related - i always have problems with the right side of my body. Ever since i was about 12 , my right leg always swells up (a LOT) on a plane or in the heat..my left leg remains the same size though and my right just looks ridiculous. Doctors hadnt a clue

    Recently I had a scan done of my spine and it showed that my pelvis is tilted quite a lot to the right, my knee injury was on my right knee...my right calf/ankle is VISIBLY bigger than the left, i massively feel like im "uneven".. i wonder if this could affect the nerves in any way

    Im interested to read what you said about MS, i always thought it was a disease that you inherited, i didnt realise you could bring it on yourself. Must admit the only junk food I eat is chocolate but this is in excess so really need to cut this out!
     
  10. ZenJen

    ZenJen New Member

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  11. kvdp

    kvdp New Member

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    Hi
    I wouldn't say MS is self-inflicted, the point is that there are many factors contributing to any situation. Doctors focus on the aspects that are impossible to change, eg genes, and ignore the rest. We prefer to focus on the aspects that can be changed, and I believe it is a better strategy. I believe many alternative practitioners are better trained than doctors in these aspects also.

    Pelvic tilts, twists, torsions and sheers are very common, and they have knock-on effects everywhere. In your case it appears as if you have affected drainage from the lymphatics of the leg, it could be related to the pelvic problem, but many other things can be involved too. For example, enlarged liver, hernia, constipation etc et to name a few.

    As for the stress, the important first step is clarity - recognising the effect things have on us does help us navigate through. Even if we can't change anything now most people find that before their problems resolve they become clear. So accept the hypothesis for now, that's all.

    The other aspect of stress is the way that our bodies adapt to it. As well as the stress you are under, we all bear multiple adaptations for many stressors, past and present. The trick is to unravel the changes we no longer need, they can weigh us down long after they are required, and they can add to the load enormously.

    Hope that helps and isn't too vague!

    On a practical note, I would suggest seek a referral to a neurologist, beware of too many invasive tests or knee-jerk medication that may arise from that, but get as much information as you can out of them. And seek out a reputable practitioner who speaks your language for personal consultation.
     
    #11 kvdp, Oct 4, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 4, 2010
  12. Terry75

    Terry75 New Member

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    Hello ZenJen

    I hope you get to read this message, as I know it's been we'll over 2 years since you posted your symptoms on here.

    I too have experienced what you seem to be experiencing, with regards to numbness across the lining of the nose and extending out to the cheek area.

    I have never been able to get a definitive diagnosis from doctors, including ENT and a rhinitis plastic surgeon, but I am about 90% sure it's pollution-related.

    I was just wondering if you are still experiencing this 'numbness', and wondered where in the country you live, as it could be environmental.

    I could elaborate further on my symptoms if you so wish, but thought I'd see if you would get to read this first sometime soon - I hope you do.

    Terry
     
  13. Lucy62a

    Lucy62a New Member

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    I have had these exact symptoms but only since this morning.

    Numbness and slight tingling extending symmetrically from the bridge of my nose outward. One person described it as feeling like they were wearing glasses that had pressed against the nose. I thought it was my glasses, so I took them off this afternoon and the symptoms persisted.

    Possible slight vision problems, similar to the black spots you see before a migraine in that they are blurred, but somehow not at all obtrusive to vision.

    I only got 4 hours sleep last night and 4 hours the night before.

    I am prescribed Dexamphetamine for ADD (inattentive type). I have had a couple of energy drinks today.

    I live in Australia. I'm in the city but the air is reasonably clean.

    I have a reasonably healthy diet, and take regular blood tests which say my vitamin levels are good. I've not eaten much iron lately.

    I'm very slim (BMI 17.6).

    My mum is a doctor and she said she'd never heard of symptoms like this before, but that if it were brain or nerve-related the numbness would likely one-sided or unevenly distributed. So it's likely that the problem is superficial and poses no threat to vision.

    I'm looking forward to seeing the next post about this in another 1 or 2 years time (that seems to be the pattern in this thread!).

    I wonder if this is the first day of the rest of my life with a numb nose! It could be worse - better to have a numb nose than a numb finger or toe :D
     
  14. Sunnybunny

    Sunnybunny New Member

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    I have been experiencing numbness across the bridge of my nose for several months now, without a cold.

    I eat a very clean whole food diet, I don't have an allergy that I am aware of. I notice that it was previously mentioned about stress and I have been under a great deal for one year. I do clench my teeth when I am stressed, I have cracked teeth even. Similar to someone who grinds their teeth I guess. But very hard on the face and jaw muscles. Right with a short time frame I had the bridge of the nose symptoms and teeth problems followed shortly thereafter. I plan to go to my doc in the next few days and ask that I at the very least get a scan done to see what is happening with my nose, and teeth?
     
  15. Jabba The Hut

    Jabba The Hut Well-Known Member

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    You could try Bowen Technique. Very effective at resolving TMJ issues, and will avoid the requirement for an invasive scan.
     

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