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Mirena Coil - your views?

Discussion in 'Womens Health' started by janiewai, Apr 14, 2004.

  1. janiewai

    janiewai New Member

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    Hi a new user here.
    I had the Mirena fit yesterday and have felt awful ever since with bad cramps and backache.

    I know these will subside but my biggest fear is weight gain, I have lost 5 stone in the past 16 months and have another half stone to lose, I have been reading that this coil can cause weight gain and now I am paranoid as no way do I want to gain any weight.

    Anyone got anything positive to say about the Mirena as I am seriously thinking of going and having it taken out because I am so scared of gaining weight

    Thanks
     
  2. lw23babe

    lw23babe New Member

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  3. AngelFish

    AngelFish New Member

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    RE: Mirena Coil - your views?

    I can't give you any personal experience, but would say.. Hang in there! You've obviously had this fitted for a good reason and it may take a few days for the trauma of fitting it to die down.
     
  4. janiewai

    janiewai New Member

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    RE: Mirena Coil - your views?

    Thanks for your messages

    The pain has eased this morning so I feel a little better. :)
     
  5. songstress

    songstress New Member

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    RE: Mirena Coil - your views?

    Hi Janie,

    I have had the coil fitted in the past, and I can honestly say that apart from a few cramps, you'll be fine. It doesn't cause weight gain as far as I know. As long as you check for it after each 'monthly', you'll be okay. You won't notice it's presence, and you can happily lose more weight without worrying about it.

    If the cramps don't settle down after a couple of days, go back to the doctor who fitted it.

    Good luck!

    Patsy.
    xxxx
     
  6. Hopefull

    Hopefull New Member

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    RE: Mirena Coil - your views?

    Hiya janie,

    Is that the coil that releases the ooo whats the word, like the pill but fitted into the coil.
    If it is I had it fitted two years ago, I remember haveing pain for about 2 days, but after that it was fine, and have got on with it quite well. I have lost weight since having it fitted, I dont really suffer with pms anymore mostly due to the fact I dont really have periods anymore:D, cramps are very rare and I am very happy with it, and best of all I dont have to remember to take anything anymore;)
     
  7. janiewai

    janiewai New Member

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    RE: Mirena Coil - your views?

    Today I feel more like myself and according to my scales still losing weight...phew!

    I think the pains got to me cos I have a 10 year old Downs little girl and she is very demmanding, that with the pain and being spaced out on painkillers made me really upset.

    Thanks for all your messages and I feel positive today. My period has even stopped and I have no pain and no spotting so happy
     
  8. kezzer

    kezzer New Member

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    RE: Mirena Coil - your views?

    :Dhad mine fitted six weeks ago its been brilliant just a little spotting and no period as yet i feel like a new woman
     
  9. Kayah

    Kayah New Member

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    RE: Mirena Coil - your views?

    Is that the coil with hormones as well?

    Well, I am aware that that coil is very popular in Ireland and Uk, but outside not really. I had mine for 5 years, but when went to take it out my ginecologist was shocked that someone let me have it, as usualy it is recomended to mature ladies.The biggest of all side effects is that it slows down your sexual needs. In married life this is a hudge problem.


    Just something to consider, from personal experiance, but of course it might be dyferent for others

    Ps. No problem with the waight gain though:D
     
  10. Amethystcave

    Amethystcave New Member

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    RE: Mirena Coil - your views?

    Hi janiewai,

    This thread interests me and if I am hijacking, I can start another thread. I'm pleased that you are feeling better today and things seem to be settling down for you.
    I really want to talk to the ladies and men on this board about menstruation.

    The whole idea of a coil inside you that lets out a little synthetic hormones into the lining of the womb that can (correct me if I am wrong, as I have only just started studying this form of contraception after a client of mine had problems with her) in 80% of women STOP periods altogether within about 12 months absolutely abhors me. That seems to be totally screwing with nature and the side effects say 20 years down the line - what are we going to find??

    Please, I am not, really NOT judging *anyone's* choices here.

    I would love to know your intimate thoughts about periods. Is there anyone here that views them as something wonderful, empowering and magical? If yes then what is it about them and if no, then why not?

    Can I ask a hypothetical question.
    I'm going to offer you a red pill or a blue pill :D
    The blue pill will stop your (or your partners) periods for ever with no side effects. Fertility will not be affected.
    The red pill will determine that you keep your periods, but that the whole of societies attitudes towards them changes to honour them as a powerful and important time.

    Which one are you going to take (or desire for your partner to take)?

    I have SO many questions about this topic as attitudes, myths and just *everything* surrounding them fascinates me.

    Does anyone use washable pads or things like the mooncup? How do you find them?

    Oh, so many questions..................

    Respectfully,
    Amethyst x
     
  11. calmer

    calmer New Member

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    RE: Mirena Coil - your views?

    LOL[sm=rollaugh.gif]

    I don't find anything empowering about standing in front of aroom full of my studentsand feeling a gush of warmth trickling down my leg when a super-duper-extra absorbent tampon AND a pad has failed to stem the flow. And, I wouldn't describe it as magical when I'm lying on a sofa at the end of a gruelling day's work, feeling like my insides are melting and that someone's just punched me in the stomach. My sister put up with extremely heavy periods, sometimes lasting for days and occuring every20 days or so,in the five years prior to her menopause.

    I've chosen the Mirena coil so I don't have to suffer the same fate as I was starting a similar pattern and the alternative is a hysterectomy which I want to avoid at all costs. After a couple of odd periods lasting for 10 - 14 days (very light) and a couple of months totally missed, everything seems to have settled sown and I'm now regular and extremely light - a normal tampon or a panty liner is usually enough to protect me. It's liberating not to have to sneak a feel at my backside when rising from a chair, to check if I've leaked and to be able to stay in hotels or at friends houses without worrying that their bed linen will look like a massacre has taken place.

    I'm struggling a bit with trying to lose weight at themoment, but I was before the coil was fitted 9 months ago. Years of yo-yo dieting have had an effect on my metabolism and I'm aiming to remedy that at the moment. Also, my libido dipped for a while but I'm getting it back a bit now.:)
     
  12. Gussie

    Gussie New Member

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    RE: Mirena Coil - your views?

    Amethystcave, I use Mooncup and have done so for a few years now, I wouldn't be without it now, I find cramping is far less with Mooncup than it ever was with tampons - I wont be going back.

    Coil - Not sure which sort I tried but went into I think it was called cervical shock, apparently my womb wasn't big enough to house it so it had to be removed immediately. It's very rare, apparently that's why they advise people with kids to have it rather than those who haven't had a pregnancy. I think it works great for most people but it wasn't for me.

    Just stick with what feels right, if you do find symptoms lessen or worsen as a result, go with what feels right - for you.
     
  13. mysticalwitch

    mysticalwitch New Member

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    RE: Mirena Coil - your views?

    My experience - My coil gave me Pelvic Inflammatory Disease 4 years after having it inserted - I'd had no problems for the first 3 years then pains on my left side over a while got gradually worse and worse till I collapsed with pain!
     
  14. keepupwith

    keepupwith New Member

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    RE: Mirena Coil - your views?

    Hi

    I had the mirena coil fitted to try and control heavy periods- all that happened was that I bled continuously instead. They say give it 6 months which I did, but then asked them to remove it. My bleeding pattern returned to normal and the breast tenderness that I'd also had went. In the end I had thermal endometrial ablation- that was 18 months ago and no problems since. To not run the risk of 'flooding' and to not be anaemic is brilliant- I should have tackled the problem a long time ago.:)
     
  15. wolfwoman

    wolfwoman New Member

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    Hi Amethyst. I am about to have my copper coil replaced with a merina coil. I have heard about the side effects and am willing to risk them with the idea of removing the coil if they become too bad. I too, with the confidence and cockiness of youth, felt that it was wrong to fill yourself with hormones and have lived my entire life without additional hormones apart from a 2 month go on the pill in my teens. However, at the ripe old age of 47, I now have a prolapse and can no longer use my mooncup which I have used for the last few years. I weigh too much for surgery and as another responder has commented, there is nothing at all to celebrate about having to change bedding several times a night despite the use of towels (bath towels that is, not sanitary towels) or of having to take spare clothes and knickers wherever you go and explain the trail of red you leave around other folks furniture! I love my mooncup and still am able to use it at night whilst laying down but my periods are too heavy for it to cope with now and it leaks because of my prolapse. It simply falls out during the day when I am upright! I would recommend it to anyone - best thing since sliced bread. It would be interesting to know how old you are and if you have ever had a heavy period, let alone years of heavy periods. There are folk worse off than me. I once sat in on a gyne clinic and heard women describe their heavy periods where they had to change their sanitary towel every 2 - 3 hours (bliss!) and also women who had to change their towels every hour or so but were talking about bath towels! So women's perception of what is heavy is very variable and I have little sympathy for the first group I mention. Anyway, enough of me and my soap box. Are you writing a book or something? I would just say, never say never!
     
  16. Handyhealer

    Handyhealer New Member

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    Hi

    I have been really interested by this topic. I am due to visit my GP on Friday to discuss at length the mirena coil. After years and years of extremely heavy and painful periods, it has been offered to me as a last ditch attempt before a hysterectomy. I have decided to try it as it is less drastic than the hysterectomy and with two small children, more practical. I can no longer tolerate standing up, only to find I have to shuffle to the bathroom to avoid an embarassing situation - although this has happened and is no joke, as many of you will sympathise with.

    I am sadly having loads of problems at the moment, this one is just the final straw!!! (being checked for coeliac disease and in the final stage of finding out if I am diabetic). I hope that the mirena may solve at least one of them and that my body may get back to 'normal' soon.

    Thanks for the original thread starter and everyone's comments about this coil, they have been really helpful to me.

    Emma x
     
  17. lindaannH

    lindaannH New Member

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    Hi folks
    I had a Mirena coil for years with not too much bother until I went to have it removed and it had moved. I had day op to remove it and periods came back with a vengence heavy and debilitating. Last year I had a MEA microwave endometrial ablation which is also day surgery (last option before hysterectomy) This has worked wonders and I have had a new lease of life.
    Hope this helps.
    Linda
     
  18. lsmorgan

    lsmorgan New Member

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    I had a regular old fashioned coil fitted and, aside from the massively heavy periods, had no other problems with it. I wouldn't have the Mirena but that's because I suffered with real problems with the pill anyway (all types). In fact the only one I had no problems with was the one that, it turned out, would kill you if you so much as looked at a pack in the chemists! lol

    Anyway, here's my take on periods.

    We have lost sight of what is normal for our bodies. If our cycle is left to its own devices and our bodies are in balance, it should be rare to have difficult periods. It's when the body is out of balance that problems occur.

    Period pains are normal (apparently, I've never had one - go on, hate me! My midwife did), but we are so caught up in the idea of pain as symptomatic of a problem, rather than as a normal part of a natural physiological event that we pump ourselves full of anything we can in order to get rid of it. Consequently, we see having babies in the same way. Pain must be managed or deleted from the equation altogether.

    So we see the pain of childbirth as pathological rather than physiological; a sign that something's going wrong rather than signposts on the way to a normal birth. And by doing anything we can to alleviate period pains, we're missing out. Because we don't see the pain for what it is but for what it isn't. So when we go into labour, the pain is a shock (I had backache labours so still haven't had that kind of pain - I had experienced that kind of back pain though, so it was dealable with). Don't misunderstand me. Pregnancy and birth do go wrong, and I've seen and experienced it going horribly wrong. But according to the WHO, 15% of all births require some form of intervention. Which is interesting when you consider that around 85% actually get it.

    So now the thread has been hijacked again and moved on to what constitutes normal birth. So I'll just close in saying that the medicalisation of the first world has caused normal events to be seen as abnormal (just look at the caesarean rate for breech presentation, let alone the general rate). The conventional medical profession has its place, and it's a very important place in the treatment of what we might consider abnormal physiology, for want of a better expression (injury, disease and sickness). It has no place in the normal.
     
    #18 lsmorgan, Oct 2, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 2, 2008
  19. Elensdottir

    Elensdottir Member

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    Re: Mirena coil

    The Mirena coil has revolutionised gynaecological practice. The gynaecologist I work with would stick one in every patient if he could! Not so long ago, the only option for women with menorrhagia (very heavy periods) was a hysterectomy, or oral hormones. Because the Mirena delivers the progesterone where it's needed, it does not have the same side effects as swallowing progesterone tablets.

    I had a Mirena 7 years ago. Initially there were some short-lived side-effects: pain, breast tenderness, spotting - and worst of all acne, but once this settled down after about 6 months, all was fine and I haven't bled since. I used to get terrible PMT and 'irritable bowel syndrome' associated with my periods, but all this disappeared. If your periods disappear, then your ovaries have been suppressed - no more PMT - Hallelujah!

    The Mirena is not the same as the old-fashioned copper coils and does not cause pelvic inflammatory disease, in fact, there is evidence that it offers some protection against it.

    As with everything else, not everyone gets on with it. A friend of mine couldn't cope with the side effects and had an endometrial ablation instead. She thought this was great for about 9 months, but now her terrible back ache has returned (but not the excessive bleeding, of course).
     
  20. wolfwoman

    wolfwoman New Member

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    I would agree with much of what you say about what is normal. However - normal for humanity is just enough food (if you are lucky), physical work on a daily basis, and women either being pregnant or breast feeding which means - if my understanding is correct - that women who live this lifestyle, rarely have periods during their lives. What is not normal, is our sedentary, overfed lifestyle with periods every month of our adult lives except for perhaps the time we are pregnant and for some, breastfeeding. Because we are so well nourished, even those of us who breast fed for prolonged periods, have regular periods. Perhaps we need to establish a new normal for western women of what is "normal" period pain and bleeding as opposed to the abnormal which interferes big time with "normal life". Having got to the ripe old age of 47 with "normal" periods which included cramps and heavy bleeding (and no artificial hormonal input) - I have now got to the abnormal and do not wish to feel criticised for wanting to do something about that. What is that wonderful saying? "walk a mile in someone's shoes before judging" (misquoted, I am sure.........)
     

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