Healthypages

Is it Psychotherapy, or isn't it?

Discussion in 'Psychotherapy' started by David100351, Nov 2, 2011.

  1. David100351

    David100351 Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Messages:
    258
    Likes Received:
    18
    I noticed, belatedly, that a topic I posted in the Counselling section http://www.healthypages.co.uk/forum/psychotherapy/64748-regulation-counselling-psychotherapy.html had been moved here.

    I should point out that the BACP can't distinguish between counselling and psychotherapy, and the hPC got into all kinds of trouble trying to invent some differences, notably to do with length of training, There seems to e no difference in the measurable outcomes between courses of counselling and psychotherapy - although what that means in practice could be up for debate.

    Perhaps they should give the job of differentiating to the longsuffering HP mods?

    Seriously, does anyone here have any ideas? I am a BACP accredited counsellor and psychotherapist, and I don't.
     
  2. ranelagh

    ranelagh New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2013
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    Psychotherapy or Counselling

    There is no difference in training or practice between psychotherapy and counselling, but there is often a difference in where people work. This difference is currently merging, but generally holds true historically.

    If you worked directly within the primary health service then you would traditionally favour the word 'psychotherapist' offering 'psychotherapy'. 'Psycho' sounds scientific and to do with the mind. 'Therapy' sounds medical.

    If you worked in private practice outside a health service setting then you would traditionally favour the word 'Counsellor' and 'Counselling'. 'Counsellor' sounds like a wise old friend, as generally you have clients who do not have a medical problem only an emotional one.

    So 'psychotherapy' is used if you need to persuade medical staff that your treatment is on a par with theirs, and 'counsellor' is used if you need to highlight the non-medical emotional nature of your work. Either way, the training and actual way of working are the same.
     
  3. sacrel

    sacrel Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    Messages:
    685
    Likes Received:
    16
    I don't know if David is still active on HP? but just to add to ranelagh's comment the following link may help to provide further info for your question?

    The Difference Between Counselling and Psychotherapy
     
    2 people like this.
  4. Masha B

    Masha B New Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2005
    Messages:
    999
    Likes Received:
    6
    UKCP's brief definitions on different professions related to psychological therapy [DLMURL="http://www.psychotherapy.org.uk/different_psychological_professions.html"]Different psychological professions[/DLMURL]

    Masha
     
  5. ranelagh

    ranelagh New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2013
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    There's a surprise. The United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy rates psychotherapists as better trained than counsellors.

    So someone with a PhD in counselling, or a professor in counselling such as John McLeod who holds Professorial positions at the University of Abertay, Dundee, UK, and University of Oslo, Norway, is not as well trained as most UKCP psychotherapists? I think Professor McLeod may disagree!
     
  6. Richard Lawton3

    Richard Lawton3 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    27
    I feel there are 2 different issues here. First is simple terminology: is it useful to be able to distinguish between methods? I personally would say that counselling tends to be more short-term and focused on the resolution of a specific problem; psychotherapy tends to be longer-term and more interested in the whole story of how this person came to be who they are. This is perhaps how the terms have been used historically: psychotherapy is longer and deeper.

    The second one is a matter of individual competence. There are most certainly counsellors who are 'better' than many psychotherapists. To me this is a matter of the training they did and (more importantly) the depth of their own personal development and breadth of personal and professional experience.
     
  7. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,422
    Likes Received:
    1,073
    Richard, you may not get an answer. This is a pretty old post.
     
  8. Richard Lawton3

    Richard Lawton3 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    27
    Ah well, it got a reply from you!
     
  9. Tashanie

    Tashanie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2010
    Messages:
    1,918
    Likes Received:
    626
    and from me....but thats only because like Crowan when I log on I look for new posts! However your comments may well still be seen by someone who will benefit :)
     
  10. Richard Lawton3

    Richard Lawton3 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    27
    That's 3 of us... we almost have a convention! :)
     
    2 people like this.
  11. David100351

    David100351 Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Messages:
    258
    Likes Received:
    18
    Well, I'm back! And I do agree with Richard. In fact I may well use his wording on my website.
    Thanks.
    And, Tashanie/Sally/Krystal, I've retired as a pharmacist. I just don't do drugs any more.
     

Share This Page

This site uses XenWord.