Healthypages

Is cooking better than frying?

Discussion in 'Diet & Nutrition' started by Anne Mary, May 18, 2015.

  1. Anne Mary

    Anne Mary Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Messages:
    405
    Likes Received:
    73
    I like to lightly fry my veg, then add some liquid and cook till they’re done. However, I have the feeling that with sautéing you lose more nutrients, beause it’s hotter.
    Can anyone tell me what difference it makes nutrition-wise, if you regularly sauté, instead of cook your veg?
    By the way, I always use the cooking water for soup!
     
  2. amy green

    amy green Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Messages:
    2,246
    Likes Received:
    636
    Yes it would seem that some nutrients are adversely affected...see under 'heat sensitive nutrients'
    http://www.livestrong.com/article/461289-does-heat-destroy-nutrients-in-fruits-vegetables/
     
    2 people like this.
  3. Anne Mary

    Anne Mary Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Messages:
    405
    Likes Received:
    73
    Thank you. However, I knew this, more or less. My question was rather: what is the difference between cooking and sauteing? I once read that sauteing is worse for some veg and some nutrients, as it's hotter.
    Actually, just found it in my files:
    I seem to have lost the source of this.
    So it's the carotenoids: beta-carotene, lycopene, all good anti-oxidants. If I get it right!

    On the other hand:
    http://www.livestrong.com/article/545378-nutritional-value-of-fried-vegetables/

    On the third hand, (if you have that many):
    http://www.webmd.com/diet/best-cook-vegetables

    So .... I think I have to watch out for the carotenoid-loss, but generally sauteing brings out the flavour and that’s worth something!
     
  4. amy green

    amy green Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Messages:
    2,246
    Likes Received:
    636
    Yes Anne Mary - if it helps to make sense of this, Vit A is fat soluble.
     
  5. Anne Mary

    Anne Mary Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Messages:
    405
    Likes Received:
    73
    I have all my veg with plenty of butter!
     
  6. MaShe

    MaShe New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2013
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    7
    sautéing makes it really hotter only in the edges so maybe you lose some but not all. And it's worth it i think.
     
  7. Anne Mary

    Anne Mary Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Messages:
    405
    Likes Received:
    73
    Especially if you add some spices ....
     
    2 people like this.
  8. Evansura

    Evansura New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    14
    Well, now i want some sautéed vegies... Look what you did ;)
     
    4 people like this.
  9. mikee888

    mikee888 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2016
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am cooking my vegetables always, because I think that this method is healthier.
     
  10. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,422
    Likes Received:
    1,075
    Why?
     
  11. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,422
    Likes Received:
    1,075
    I ask because 'cooking' is generally defined as preparing and heating food and therefore frying, sautéing, boiling, baking etc. are all cooking. So, mikee888, how are you cooking and what is it healthier than?
     
  12. Anne Mary

    Anne Mary Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Messages:
    405
    Likes Received:
    73
    What I do these days is: I cook half, and saute half, and then mix them together: better taste, with still more nutrients than if I had cooked it all.
     
  13. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,422
    Likes Received:
    1,075
    I repeat: what do you mean by 'cook'?
     
  14. Anne Mary

    Anne Mary Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Messages:
    405
    Likes Received:
    73
    Boil a bit of water, throw it in, take it out when soft. Don't like steaming for it takes too long before veg is soft enough for my liking. I eat lots of them, homegrown, so get enough vitamins and minerals anyway. Love A.
     
  15. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,422
    Likes Received:
    1,075
    So 'cooking' = boiling?

    Okay. That helps me make more sense of the entire thread. Although the generally accepted and dictionary definition of 'cooking' is preparing and heating food to eat. Therefore, it would include steaming, grilling, frying, baking et al.
     
  16. Anne Mary

    Anne Mary Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Messages:
    405
    Likes Received:
    73
    Sorry to have confused you - I think it's one of those words which can have two meanings, and it all depends on the context which is intended. xA
     
  17. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,422
    Likes Received:
    1,075
    Could you please direct me to a dictionary that defines 'cook' as 'boil'? Thanks.
    By the way, steaming should take less time than boiling since it is at a higher temperature.
     
  18. Anne Mary

    Anne Mary Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Messages:
    405
    Likes Received:
    73
    "direct me to a dictionary that defines 'cook' as 'boil'?" (I always forget how to properly quote in HP, please forgive me.)
    I can't find that, so I must be wrong. Bloody foreigners, corrupting the language!

    "steaming should take less time than boiling since it is at a higher temperature."
    Not the way I do it - in a steamer pan on top of another one with boiling water.
     
  19. Anne Mary

    Anne Mary Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Messages:
    405
    Likes Received:
    73
    Interesting! My mistake does indeed stem from being Dutch: in Holland, 'koken' has the two meanings described above. So I assumed that the same held in English, which it doesn't. Thirty-five years of confusion .... I wonder what mishaps and misunderstandings I have caused along the way?
    Thank you for enlightening me, at last.
     
    2 people like this.
  20. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,422
    Likes Received:
    1,075
    Water boils at 100 degrees C (I'm assuming you are near enough sea level for this to hold true - although in relative heat it won't change what I'm saying here) and above that temperature is water vapour. Steam is the stage where water vapour is cooling to become water again. So the water in your pan is up to 100 degrees. Even with a lid to catch and condense the vapour, by the time it is back in the water it has cooled below 100 degrees. In the steamer, at the level of your vegetables, is vapour - by definition over 100 degrees. It cools to steam as it rises and escapes into the atmosphere.
    To see this in action, look at the spout of a boiling kettle from the side. You will see that the steam starts a little way above the spout. The invisible bit is water vapour and is hotter than both the steam and the boiling water.
     

Share This Page

This site uses XenWord.