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Gallstone advice diet please

Discussion in 'Digestive Disorders' started by atlanticpearl, Jul 5, 2010.

  1. atlanticpearl

    atlanticpearl New Member

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    Hi everyone, hoping someone can give me some advice please, my question is anyone that has gallstones (who perhaps hasn't had surgery) do you follow a special diet? if so do you have a diet sheet you can email me? or send me a link to one.

    Currently a brief summary of things I eat, lots of fresh fruit and vegetables. Fish (salmon, cod, basa, hallibut, tuna, haddock - all either cooked in the oven with lemon or lime juice and herbs, depending on the fish, don't use any fat or fish is grilled). prawns, crab, tinned tuna. Eggs now and then. sweet potatoes and potatoes. home made vegetable and lentil curries, chillis now and then, rice, loctose free milk, some soya products, etc

    I don't eat meat or poultry, peppers (intollerant but can eat chillis strange), no wheat (intollerance), etc


    Thanks
    Jane
     
  2. coerdelion

    coerdelion New Member

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    Hi Jane

    Low fat, high fibre and particularly avoid the transfats found in cakes, biscuits and processed food.

    Gall bladder flush is pretty much de rigeur - you can find links to a selection of versions here, together with pictures and diagrams, if that's your interest.

    I have done the flush, after eating some *very* greasy fish and chips (I know, don't scold) on hols a few years back. Couldn't eat anything afterwards without the pain starting up and lived on apple juice for the rest of the holiday. On return home did the flush and it worked very well.

    For the pain, you might try a caster oil pack - very effective. I use a heat pad rather than a hot water bottle.

    If you are susceptible to gallstones, you might want to try qebra pedra (the stone breaker) to keep them at bay. Effective, I've found.

    I also go off and get Amatsu every now and again - pretty much an hour of torture, but weirdly effective.

    Hope this helps

    Fx
     
  3. kvdp

    kvdp New Member

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    I would add if I may that getting help with all of this from a suitable practitioner is pretty wise, this is the internet after all.

    Gallstones can have serious complications, disturbing them could cause more problems than leaving them alone ie obstructive jaundice is no joke. Hence I would suggest getting professional guidance if contemplating liver flushes.

    Further, if the intestine is struggling eg with constipation then this may need addressing first, as the exit route needs to be clear in order for the liver to drain efficiently.

    Moreover problems downstream could be part of the reason for the problem in the first place, as the body normally expells unwanted matter if it is able. You can't always tell from daily bowel habit alone.

    Your diet as presented appears to be basically okay, but I would suggest avoiding soya and avoiding strongly spiced curries. Wheat intolerance suggests that the basis of the problem may lie in the bowel function, and that in turn can have its origins in lots of places, again a good reason to get a proper personal consultation.
     
    #3 kvdp, Jul 5, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 5, 2010
  4. atlanticpearl

    atlanticpearl New Member

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    Hi and thanks for the info. is that a particular professional one should refer too (i prefer holistic wise if possible). For a different matter (I have ME/CFS) a member suggested i see a BANT person and are hoping to get an apt with them shortly.

    the gallstones were picked up on a ct scan which was of the pelvic and abdomonial areas the problem isn't constant, ie quite a while back (around 2 years ago) I was in excriating pain and passed grit so i presume it was a stone which broke up, since then i have had one lot of pain which passed and nothing came out

    thanks
    jane
     
  5. atlanticpearl

    atlanticpearl New Member

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    Hi Fiona

    Many thanks for the advice. At the moment I am waiting the consultation letter (the hopsital phoned me today to advise that according to CT scan its gallstones and the secretary immediately said oh you will have to have surgery to remove the gallblader!!! interesting I wonder if the secretary is actually qualified to give out advice!). anyway the problem isn't constant, I passed something gritty which i presume was a stone which broke about 2 years ago...then since then had one lot of excruiating pain but passed nothing. re the qp do you have capuels or tea and where do you buy the products?

    I try where possible to eat a reasonably healthy diet, but do have the occasionally chcoolate, but from a net search i see that's off the menu!!!!

    I went to the drs (who arranged for an apt at the gastroenlogy dept) as I am having problems losing weight and my stomach looks like i am very pregnant, which I am not.

    Best wishes
    Jane
     
  6. kvdp

    kvdp New Member

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    Not sure, hopefully somebody here will make a suggestion. I generally avoid such specific advice here because there's a risk that we'll all plug our favourite therapies and that's no help at all.

    This clearly isn't just about the gall-bladder but the functioning of whole system out of tune - not sick, but either lacking coordination or dealing with acquired patterns of strain.

    The main thing is to find the right person to coordinate the therapy and help you navigate the various twists and turns of events.

    The fact that the CFS picture is being dealt with as a seperate issue suggests the required coordination has already been lost - it's all part of the same jigsaw - find someone who can see this clearly.

    So, for example, I am not a colonic hydrotherapist, but I may need a colonic hydrotherapist at times to undertake those tasks for my patients, but I will always seek complete oversight and direction of the case. The hydrotherapist, in turn, needs to be comfortable working in this way; most therapists try and steer things in the direction they know, but only seeing their part of the story. Without one person keeping a grip on the the whole show it's easy to lose control of a case, and that's no help either.

    Ask friends, family and colleagues who they have been to for various things - you may be surprised at the range of holistic health experience in your own neighbourhood - and begin there.
     
    #6 kvdp, Jul 5, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 5, 2010
  7. coerdelion

    coerdelion New Member

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    Hi Jane

    I have two relatives who have had their gall bladders removed - and still have symptoms, because of course, taking the gall bladder away doesn't address the cause. It pretty much complicates things actually.

    Kvdp, you may be right - I Reiki daily, tap and do various healing modalities, so didn't give it another thought. However, many people do the flush without any side effects. One has to make sure that one has apple juice and nothing else for 3 days beforehand, so that the guts are clear, as you point out, and the stones are softened sufficiently to pass easily down the tube.

    Frankly, Jane, the flush itself is pretty unpleasant. However, as we both know the pain is excruciating - so the flush is worth it.

    You could try quebra pedra (sorry, spelled it wrong last time) first - it really is most efficient at breaking up stones. There's an article about it here

    The pain can be managed with caster oil packs, if you get any more - oily, but efficient. My kids were rather grossed out by the cling film I bound it on with.

    Fx
     
  8. amandaclegg

    amandaclegg New Member

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    I developed gallstones about 9 years ago and lived for a year with intermittent but excruciating pain, despite a very sensible diet. had a cholestectomy in the end - quite a major op even tho it's keyhole, but haven't looked back since. you don't need your gallbladder: its just a storage reservoir for the bile, and as long as you eat a good healthy diet anyway, you should be fine. Why put up with the pain?
     
  9. atlanticpearl

    atlanticpearl New Member

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    Hi your case sounds like it was quite severe, mine isn't. I had a problem two years ago when passed something gritty (broken stone perhaps) and a pain a few months back and passed nothing. It was only when I had a CT scan recently due to something else that gallstones were picked up. For me if surgery isn't essential then I won't have it done, but will look into options once I hear back from the hospital (I was only told yesterday by phone that I have gallstones don't know to what extent, the options, etc). I did read on the net that if you have your gallblader removed there is a higher risk of getting bowel cancer. Of course I am aware that one can develop cancers, etc. Some people who do have their gallbladder removed still get problems, but as mentioned once I have had a referral to another consultant from the gastroenlogy department then i can consider all options. Glad though you are now pain free
     
  10. kvdp

    kvdp New Member

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    Sure we don't actually need a gallbladder, just as we don't need our legs, both our lungs, our colons, our appendix, spleen, stomach, teeth, eyes, hearing, tongue, hands, reproductive organs, house, money, etc etc. We can of course find ways to accomodate and survive without a great many things, that does not mean that it makes no difference if we have them or not.

    Apparently we can cope and even thrive without large amounts of brain tissue http://www.mindreality.net/is-your-brain-really-necessary

    Whilst removal of the gallbladder is certainly more desirable than leaving a pathological one in place, removal is not simply a lifestyle choice. Surgery itself has risks, and as Fiona has pointed out, removing the diseased organ is not the same as curing the disease - the system is still under strain for whatever reason, and now minus one of its coping mechanisms - a reservoir to regulate the flow of bile according to demand. Animals without gall-bladders such as horses must graze all day long to buffer the constant stream of bile so that it does not irritate the intestine.

    On a brighter note, I do know of a case where this surgery was completely averted using alternative approaches, and two years later has remained trouble-free and no stones seen on the latest scan. I think it worth mentioning that direct treatments to the affected organ, including liver flushes, were not employed.
     
    #10 kvdp, Jul 6, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 6, 2010
  11. coerdelion

    coerdelion New Member

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    Nice. How did you do that, K?

    Fx
     
  12. kvdp

    kvdp New Member

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    Oh gosh, there's a big subject, need to answer that on several levels. Not here, I think. Suffice to say it's about understanding the full context of the problem. The body is entirely self maintaining, if an organ is in trouble, why isn't the system giving it what it needs to function? Going straight to the damaged part is how you fix a car, not a living system.
     
  13. CarolineN

    CarolineN New Member

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    I agree with you absolutely kvdp! One always needs to ask WHY? why? and why again? to get back to the cause - treating symptoms does not solve the problem - and as every individual is slightly different then one needs to see and assess the whole person before giving direct advice.

    I would suggest a BANT registered nutritional therapist will help, but one might also look at a qualified heerbalist, doctor of functional medicine, etc as those who might be able to help solve the problem as to why the stones were formed in the first place and what do they consist of - because that affects the dietary response. Many people have stones and are unaware of them but when the gallbladder gets inflamed then this causes serious pain, or when stones are passed.

    The lack of a gallbladder can cause problems too - further down the gut, as previously mentioned, and this needs help too. Unfortunately nothing is simple!
     
  14. doelmel

    doelmel New Member

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    For some people with stones in the common bile duct, a special type of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram (ERCP) called endoscopic sphincterotomy may be used to remove gallstones that block the common bile duct. The doctor places an endoscope down the throat to the small intestine. The doctor then uses another procedure to widen the opening between the common bile duct and the small intestine and takes the stones out using a small basket. After ERCP, surgery to remove the gallbladder is often the next step.
    However, endoscopic sphincterotomy may not prevent the need for gallbladder removal. One study found that symptoms returned within 2 years in 47% of people who had only sphincterotomy, compared with 2% who had immediate gallbladder removal. Of those people in the study who had recurrent symptoms, 81% eventually needed gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy).
    Overall, gallstones return within 5 years after nonsurgical treatment in 30% to 50% of people.
     
    #14 doelmel, Feb 22, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 23, 2012
  15. atlanticpearl

    atlanticpearl New Member

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    thanks, family member had gallstones removed last year and gallbladder out recently
     
  16. taffygirl

    taffygirl New Member

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    Hello I'm new here and need some advice, but first I'd like to question the above quote.
    As well as gallbladder disease with small stones, also I have acute Diverticulitis, my doctor will not take out my GB as the bile which would constantly leak into my intestines and would make the DV worse for me, as bile is acid.

    Oh, and for those who eat prawns, don't, they are high in cholesterol and people with GB disease have problems with high cholesterol.

    I need to know if anyone has successful experiences of reducing their cholesterol and can they recommend anything which would help.

    Another question is has anyone benefitted from Chinese medicine for our problem?

    thanks
     
  17. StrawberryMoon

    StrawberryMoon New Member

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    Gall Stone Diet

    Hi
    I had a diagnosis of Gallstones back in June, I did the Gall Stone / Liver Flush. (Olive oil, grapefruits and epsom salts) twice over the past 3 months. Since then I have had a ultrasound and they have found nothing, I havn't had any pain and I am eating a healthy diet and sometimes fatty foods, with no problems.
     
  18. taffygirl

    taffygirl New Member

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    Thanks for coming back to me Strawberry moon. I tried to do the flush, mine was a pint of olive oil, and half pint of lemon juice drunk in small doses every 15 mins. after two hours I felt so ill I stopped. Went to bed, lay on my right side and in the morning , nothing!

    My consultant who is not the best I have to say told me not to do it as stones can get into the pancreas and that is where trouble REALLY starts.

    I am in mild pain all the time and am sick of it ( pardon the pun)
    would you tell me what you did for your flush please? I'd try again if it worked!
     
  19. Tashanie

    Tashanie Well-Known Member

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    I can appreciate the point you are making - but sometimes parts of the body really DO need to be removed to ensure the rest of the body doesn't suffer.

    We all need thyroid glands - but I had to have mine removed last year.

    I am a huge believer in complementary therapies - well I wouldn't be doing what I do if I didn't . But they are complementary NOT alternative and modern medicine (and surgery) DO have something to offer.
     
  20. crabapple

    crabapple New Member

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    Hi,

    I had my gallbladder removed just two weeks ago after 10 months of suffering pain, no gallstones, so they just kept leaving it. I tried every therapy possible, thought it in the end it was in my head.

    I was very, very lucky in the end. I was rushed in to A and E and had an emergency op to remove it as it was septic. Two days after being released from hospital I went into septic shock!

    Why am I telling you this? Please, please be careful with flushes and other holistic therapies. I am not saying that there is no place for them, I totally believe in them, but sometimes we need other interventions as well, the damage has been done irreparably before we have had time to notice, that is what I believe happened with me.

    I do hope I have not put any noses out saying this, I just think sometimes we need to consult a gp as well and take their advice.

    Crabapple x
     

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