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Abstract Mathematics in ancient cultures

Discussion in 'Scientific Matters' started by jnani, Jul 16, 2013.

  1. jnani

    jnani Well-Known Member

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    Been watching some of the achievements of many ancient civilizations. Greeks, Egyptians, Romans, Inca, Mayans amongst many others Fascinating stuff. All the wonderful things they came to know and did!
    India had been practicing advanced mathematics, astronomy, astrology and abstract mathematics much before any European civilization. With colonization of India most of its intellectual property got undermined and re-attributed to European scholars.

    This is just one of the many many I have been watching- a video about the value of pie. it is fascinating.Science of mathematics in Ancient India - YouTube
     
    #1 jnani, Jul 16, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 16, 2013
  2. derekgruender

    derekgruender New Member

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    You are right, Jnani. The history of mathematics is very interesting and, I seem to remember that apart from many other amazing contributions to our understanding of maths, it was the ancient Indian culture that gave us the 'zero'. Imagine now, where we'd be without it!
     
  3. jnani

    jnani Well-Known Member

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    Glad you find it engaging too Derek, I will continue to post some of the marvellous stuff by ancients.
     
  4. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

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    A few years ago I went to an exhibition at the Science Museum in London, about the history of mathematics. If we were to believe the information in that exhibition, no one but the Ancient Greeks and the British ever did any maths!

    The entire exhibition had no mention of algebra. I thought this was particularly bad at a time when the general perception of Islam – from both Muslims and non-Muslims – is that the religion is very anti-science.

    I’d like, therefore, to mention someone that I think should be better known: Mohammed ibn-Musa al-Khwarizmi wrote a book entitled ‘Hisab al-jabr w’al muqabela’ (Transposition and Reduction), explaining that any problem can be reduced to one of six forms using the processes of al-jabr – transferring terms to eliminate negative quantities – and muqabela – balancing the remaining positive quantities (thereby inventing quadratic equations). The book was written in Persia in about 830.

    From ‘al-jabr’ we get the word algebra, and from the Latinized version of his name, Algoritmi, we get the word algorithm.
     
  5. jnani

    jnani Well-Known Member

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    That is true Crowan...Major European countries colonizing these "backward cultures"- were obligated for obvious reasons to undermine their intellectual endeavors ( which in most cases were miles ahead of their own) and put their own name to most of their discoveries. They had to go along with superiority inferiority thing to be able to conquer/enslave peoples of other nations. Fair enough.

    I naturally know a little more about achievments of ancient and middle age India ..how far had they gone into mathematics and other subjects Chemistry, ( India had been extracting zinc from zinc ore for 4000years The rest of the world started that around 16th century), matallurgy in the form of iron pillars that have stood exposed to elements pollution of the blessed country for 1000 -2400 yeas without a trace of rust. Aryabutta is practically unknown in the west but had some pretty amazing discoveries to his name( or not to his name!)


    Here is another video that explores mathematical prowess of ancients. It is long but it is entertaining and enlightening .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wUP5rtwvsUI
     
  6. Energylz

    Energylz Moody-rator ©
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    A couple of books I've read contain some interesting history on mathematics, and they're also good reads on their topics too...

    Zero : The Biography of a Dangerous Idea - by Charles Seife
    Fermat's Last Theorem - by Simon Singh

    :)

    All Love and Reiki Hugs
     

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