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A bit of good news

Discussion in 'Current Affairs' started by Principled, Dec 30, 2016.

  1. Principled

    Principled Well-Known Member

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  2. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

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    I've read of plastic bottles being filled with sand and used as bricks. It seems very effective.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environ...ecycled-waste-plastic-bottles-western-sahara-

    And, of course, the greenhouses that can be made -https://www.greenoptimistic.com/plastic-bottles-greenhouse/#.WuBKJ24vzIU

    I'd be tempted to try this but I don't drink anything from plastic bottles, and the few I get (from visitors who leave their empties here) get cut down for mini-cloches.
     
  3. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

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    And an idea I came across this morning - a water filled bottle being used in a greenhouse as a heat mass.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Principled

    Principled Well-Known Member

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    Interesting Jane, but, just to show my ignorance, what is a heat mass?

    Judy
     
  5. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

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    The sun, through the greenhouse glass and through the plastic of the bottle, warms the water. During the night the water gives out its heat, slowly. It wouldn't heat the whole greenhouse (although people with bigger greenhouses sometimes have a large water container for this), but it would be enough to protect a tender plant.
     
  6. Principled

    Principled Well-Known Member

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    Well you learn something every day! Thanks Jane. :)
     
  7. Principled

    Principled Well-Known Member

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    Now you probably won't approve of this, (using systemic weedkiller) but our garden was infested with bindweed. I tried digging it out and just couldn't believe how long the roots were (according to one source I read, they can grow to 30 feet!). Of course, every time a bit breaks, it becomes a new plant, so that wasn't working. Then I read about what has been a solution.

    At church we only have a small fridge, so we re-fill a large water bottle, until the plastic starts to look discoloured (several months). I've started bringing them home and I cut off the base, having put sticks in the ground, beside the new bindweed coming through, which then curls around it. I place the bottle over the stick of bindweed and spray systemic weed killer through the top, then close it. The spray doesn't touch any other plants and the rain doesn't wash the chemical away and it only affects that one weed, not the soil or anything else. It looks awful, but it works as nothing else did.

    At the Savill Garden, near here, there were several flowerbeds infected with it, they actually cleared them and left them bare for two years, trying to destroy all the bindweed. Thankfully they are back to looking glorious again. You can mulch them on bare ground, but our flowerbeds are not bare! So am grateful for the plastic bottles.
     
    #107 Principled, Apr 26, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2018
  8. Energylz

    Energylz Moody-rator ©
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    Bindweed is a real pain on our allotment. Always having to try and dig it out and, like you say, the roots can go for miles.
     
  9. Principled

    Principled Well-Known Member

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    :(
     
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  10. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

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    We only have bindweed in a part of the garden and make an effort to keep it that way. I did my first 'bindweed patrol' of the year yesterday, just pulling it up (I don't dig). Eventually it weakens.
     
  11. Principled

    Principled Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Jane, I'll try that. We were OK until I had to make a new pond because we added a sun room. The bindweed appeared in all the soil that I'd dug up and which is now around the pond. Which just goes to show it's best not to disturb it! :(
     
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  12. Crowan

    Crowan Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely. The one part of our garden that has it is across a lane that runs through the garden and, in the growing season, we patrol the lane every couple of days to ensure none is creeping across. The bit of the garden across the lane used to be a couple of allotments and, according to the people who have lived around here for years, was double dug and rotovated. Perfect for bindweed and other weeds of cultivation.

    By the way, bindweed is edible. They do contain several alkeloids so best to cook them (boil or steam). Use the young leaves. Also, they make a good plant food. Put them into water (in a lidded bucket) for a few weeks. Use the water to feed plants and - because the bindweed is then dead - put the plant into the compost. Obviously, you don't want to put the freshly pulled up plant in the compost - that's a great way to spread it!
     
  13. Principled

    Principled Well-Known Member

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  14. Principled

    Principled Well-Known Member

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  15. Zandalee

    Zandalee Active Member

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    So so true! I always learn from your post. Grateful for your sharing and keeping us aware
     
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  16. Charis

    Charis Active Member

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  17. Zandalee

    Zandalee Active Member

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    Yes. Yes. Each step small or large is worth the effort!
    Thank you for this informative information.
     
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  18. Principled

    Principled Well-Known Member

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  19. Zandalee

    Zandalee Active Member

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    Thank you... thrilled to do more reading on this plastic eating Bactria. Fascinating.
     

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